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Nutrient levels account for a 17% variation in memory and thinking ability, and a 37% variation in brain volume in a group of study individuals.
A study published in Neurology has found that certain nutrients work together synergistically to promote brain health. The study looked at the effects of diet and nutrient intake in seniors on memory, thinking and brain volume.
The researchers recruited 104 individuals (average age 87) and measured blood levels of certain nutrients, as well as memory and thinking in all study participants. They also analyzed MRI scans to determine the brain volume of 42 of the subjects.
Participants in the study were healthy non-smokers with relatively few chronic diseases and free of memory and thinking problems. Most had generally healthy diets, but there were some with deficiencies of certain nutrients. This created enough variation to determine that nutrient status does play a significant role in memory, thinking, and brain volume. It was determined that nutrient levels accounted for 17% of the variation found in memory and thinking, and for the 37% of the variation in brain volume.
With this data, the researchers came to three conclusions. The first conclusion is that individuals with diets high in omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins C, D, E, and B were more likely to score better on memory and thinking tests. Those with diets high in trans-fat were more likely to both score poorly on memory and thinking tests, and to have brain shrinkage. Finally, individuals with low omega-3 fatty acid intake and other nutrient intake are more likely to have lower brain volume.
Getting adequate nutrients through a balanced diet and supplements may be an important overall approach to maintaining good brain health and thinking ability as we age.
Bowman GL, Silbert LC, Howieson D, et al. Nutrient biomarker patterns, cognitive function, and MRI measures of brain aging. Neurology. 2012;78(4):241-9.
Compared to placebo, patients taking Vitamin E had slower functional decline and needed less caregiver assistance.
A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association reports on the benefit of high dose Vitamin E in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s Disease. The double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial involved 613 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s Disease. Participants were randomized to receive 2,000 international units (IU) of vitamin E, 20 milligrams of memantine, a combination of both, or a placebo daily. Average follow-up was 2.3 years.
Patients were analyzed on their capability to perform daily living activities, memory and language, cognitive function, behavioral and psychological issues, and the time needing caregiver assistance. The data was measured and collected at the beginning of the study and every six months during the trial.
Over the years of follow-up, scores declined by 3.15 units less in the Vitamin E group compared with the placebo group. In the memantine group, the scores declined 1.98 units less than the decline in the placebo group. Compared to the placebo group, those taking Vitamin E had an average delay in clinical progression of 19% per year, or approximately 6.2 months over the follow-up period.
Patients receiving the vitamin also needed less caregiver assistance in comparison with the placebo group. There was no significant difference in all-cause mortality or safety issues reported between the placebo and Vitamin E groups.
This study showed that high dose Vitamin E appears to slow functional decline and caregiver burden in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s Disease.
Dysken MW, Sano M, Asthana S, et al. Effect of vitamin E and memantine on functional decline in Alzheimer disease: the TEAM-AD VA cooperative randomized trial. JAMA. 2014;311(1):33-44.

PreschoolA new Cochrane Review suggests that zinc supplementation might reduce the overall risk of death in children 6 months to 12 years-old.

Zinc is a trace mineral that is needed for many important functions in the body. Deficiency may cause problems with growth, diarrhea, and immune function. Mild zinc deficiency may be overlooked, since symptoms are not always obvious and may include loss of hair, appetite, weight, and the senses of taste and smell. Severe zinc deficiency contributes to numerous child deaths per year due to diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria.

In a newly published Cochrane Review, researchers conducted a comprehensive literature search for data on the effects of zinc in children 6 months to 12 years-old. Eighty well-designed clinical trials with a total of 205,401 participants were ultimately identified for inclusion.

The Cochrane review found that giving children zinc supplement might reduce their risk of death in general, particularly their risk of death due to diarrhea. Children given zinc experience less diarrhea than children not given zinc. The review noted that zinc supplements may be associated with increased risk of vomiting.

The author concluded that the benefits of preventive zinc supplementation outweigh the harms in areas where the risk of zinc deficiency is relatively high. Further research should determine optimal intervention characteristics such as supplement dose.

Source:
Mayo-Wilson et al. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 May 15;5:CD009384. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009384.pub2

weight lossA low glycemic index (GI), low calorie diet with moderate amounts of carbohydrates is more effective for controlling hunger, and improving weight loss and insulin sensitivity than a low-fat, high GI diet.

Obesity is one of the most significant health concerns worldwide and is related to health issues such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. Low-glycemic index (GI) diets have shown to have beneficial effects in many chronic conditions such as these, but their impact on weight loss, satiety and inflammation are still somewhat inconclusive.

In a new study published online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers compared the effects of 3 diets on weight loss, satiety, inflammation and other metabolic markers. The randomized controlled study included 122 overweight or obese men and women aged 30 to 60 years. During the study period of 6 months, participants were randomly assigned to one of 3 isocaloric, energy-restricted diets: 1) a moderate carbohydrate and high-GI diet (HGI), 2) a moderate-carbohydrate and low-GI-Low Fat diet (LGI), 3) a low-fat and high-GI diet (LF) patterned after the American Heart Association Diet.

Reductions in BMI were greater in the Low GI group than the LF by week 16 and at the completion of the study. Measurements of insulin sensitivity, fasting insulin and beta-cell function were all significantly better in the LGI group than the LF group. Although the differences in the 3 groups didn’t reach statistical significance, there was a tendency for a greater improvement with a low-GI diet with respect to hunger, satiety, lipid profiles and other inflammatory and metabolic markers.

The results of this study showed that a low-calorie low-GI diet with moderate amounts of carbohydrates is more effective than a high-GI low-fat diet at decreasing body weight and improving markers of insulin metabolism.

Source:
Martí Juanola-Falgarona et al. Am J Clin Nutr June 2014. doi:10.3945/ajcn.113.081216.

Green tea extract (GTE) is correlated with numerous health benefits related to cardiovascular and metabolic health.

Green tea consumption has been known to be associated with enhanced cardiovascular and metabolic health. Based on previous research showing that green tea extract has a positive impact on numerous health parameters, researchers at Poznan University of Medical Sciences in Poland hypothesized that supplementation with GTE would improve insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in obese, hypertensive individuals.

Fifty-six obese, hypertensive study participants were randomized to receive either a placebo or 379 mg of GTE daily for three months. Several health-related measurements were taken at baseline and again at the end of the three month period. Some of the key measurements included blood pressure, plasma lipid levels, glucose levels, total antioxidant status, and insulin levels.

The results of this double-blind, placebo-controlled study showed a correlation between the GTE supplementation and several markers of health status. GTE supplementation was associated with a statistically significant decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 4.9 and 4.7 mmHg, respectively.

When compared with the placebo there was also a significant reduction in fasting serum glucose, insulin levels, and insulin resistance. A significant decrease in LDL and an increase in HDL cholesterol were also observed. In addition, total antioxidant status increased, while serum tumor necrosis factor α and C-reactive protein were lowered.

Results from this research continue to add strong evidence supporting the use of GTE supplementation. The researchers acknowledge that their study only apply to one particular group of individuals. However, because this group of individuals is overrepresented in many modern populations, the study authors recommend that the effect of GTE supplementation should be further evaluated.

Source:
Bogdanski P. et al. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.). 2012; 32(6):421-7.

 

A recent study has shown that nutrient levels account for a 17% variation in memory and thinking ability, and a 37% variation in brain volume in a group of older individuals.

Lifestyle interventions such as diet, exercise, and cognitive training represent an effective approach to counteracting age-related declines in brain health.  A study published in the December issue of Neurology has found that certain nutrients work together synergistically to promote brain health. The study looked at the effects of diet and nutrient intake in seniors on memory, thinking and brain volume.

The researchers recruited 104 dementia-free elders (average age 87) and measured blood levels of certain nutrients, as well as memory, and thinking in all study participants. They also analysed MRI scans to determine the brain volume of 42 of the subjects.

Overall, participants in this study were healthy nonsmokers with relatively few chronic diseases and free of memory and thinking problems. Most had generally healthy diets, but there were some with deficiencies of certain nutrients. This created enough variation to determine that nutrient status does play a significant role in memory, thinking, and brain volume.

The study found that nutrient levels accounted for 17% of the variation found in memory and thinking, and for the 37% of the variation in brain volume.  Individuals with diets high in omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins C, D, E, and B were more likely to score better on memory and thinking tests;  Those with diets high in trans-fat were more likely to both score poorly on memory and thinking tests, and to have brain shrinkage; And those with low omega-3 fatty acid intake and other nutrient intake are more likely to have lower brain volume.

This study provides evidence that adequate nutrition may be an important overall approach to maintaining good brain health and thinking ability as we age.

Source:
Bowman GL, et al; Neurology 2012 Jan 24;78(4):241-9. Epub 2011 Dec 28.

17 March 2012

Fats are a necessary part of dietary energy supply.  However the quality of dietary fats, particularly long-chain Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), plays critical roles in physiological functions such as central nervous system (CNS) development and visual function in infants and children.  In addition, the effect of dietary fats on lipids metabolism at an earlier age may be associated with cardiovascular mobidity and mortality in later life.

In recent years, there has been growing researches in the quality of dietary fat intake in early life as a major determinant of growth and development in children as well as long-term health.  The selection of dietary fatty acid sources during the first years of life is now considered to be of critical importance.

Lipids are structural components of all tissues and are indispensable for the assembly of membranes and cell organelles. The brain, retina and other neural tissues are particularly rich in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).  For example, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a type of long-chain omega-3 PUFA, is a critical component of cell membranes, especially in the brain and the retina, and plays an important role in brain and visual function, due to its high content in cerebral cortex and retinal phospholipids.  DHA is considered conditionally essential during early development in childhood.

During the first 6 months of life, dietary total fat should contribute 40–60% of total energy to cover the energy needed for growth and the fat required for tissue deposition. From age 6 months to 3 years, fat intake requirements are reduced gradually to approximately 30–35% of energy depending on the physical activity of the child.  Many health organizations recommend that daily DHA intake should be between 0.2-0.5% of total fat intake for infants.  The daily Omega-3 intake for prevention of nutrition-related chronic disease should ideally fall within 1-2% of total energy intake for children over 2-yrs of age.

Vegetarian source of fats has virtually no long-chain PUFA unless algae are included in the diet.  Fish is the major source of the two important PUFAs – DHA and EPA.  Recent scientific evidence have shown that direct supply of DHA and EPA in the diet provides many health benefits including retinal and brain development and function during early childhood, cardiovascular health, inflammatory response, and allergy.  Balanced dietary intake of beneficial fats in childhood can influence risk of Cardio Vascular Diseases (CVD) later in life.

In summary, lifelong intakes of EPA and DHA are associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, as well as optimal mental development, behaviour, and immune response. Since the dietary intakes of EPA and DHA among infants and children in many western and non-western countries are lower than desirable on a unit of body weight basis and as percent of total energy, it is prudent that parents take measures to ensure that their children obtain optimal levels of EPA and DHA through diet and supplementation where required.

Source:
R Uauy and AD. Dangour; Ann Nutr Metab 2009;55:76–96

With festive and the holiday seasons, teenagers often party hard and are more likely to ignore their nutritional requirements. A recent Australian study emphasized the importance of ensuring diet quality in adolescence and its potential role in modifying mental health over the life course.

Studies have demonstrated inverse relationships between diet quality and the common mental disorders in adults. However, little is known about such association in adolescents. Given that three quarters of lifetime psychiatric disorders will emerge in adolescence or early adulthood, a recent prospective study investigated the temporal relationships between diet quality and mental health and the associations between change in diet quality and change in psychological symptoms.

Researchers collected diet and mental health information from 3040 Australian adolescents aged 11–18 years at baseline in 2005–6 and followed up in 2007–8.  The study found that boys had significantly higher scores on the Unhealthy diet scale than girls and were also more active; and that improvements in diet quality were mirrored by improvements in mental health over the follow-up period, while deteriorating diet quality was associated with poorer psychological functioning.

The researchers hypothesized that diet quality influences the genesis and/or progression of depressive illnesses by modulating inflammatory, oxidative and/or neurotrophic factors.

Given that adequate nutrition is essential during periods of rapid physical development, and that the majority of mental health problems first manifest in adolescence and early adulthood, further intervention studies are now urgently required to test the effectiveness of preventing the common mental disorders through dietary modification.  For the parents, the foods available and provided to adolescents need to be receiving much greater attention.  Particular attention should be paid to creating environments that promote healthy eating in supporting adolescents to maintain good nutrition during a difficult life stage.

Source:
Jacka FN et al. (2011) A Prospective Study of Diet Quality and Mental Health in Adolescents; PLoS ONE 6(9): e24805. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0024805

Newly published research shows that adults with high fibre intakes are less likely to gain weight and inches around the waist.

It is known that dietary fibre may play a role in obesity prevention. However the role that different individual fibre sources play in weight change is less certain. In a recent paper published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers investigated the association of total dietary fibre, cereal fibre, and fruit and vegetable fibre with changes in weight and waist circumference.

The prospective cohort study included 89,432 European participants, aged 20–78 years, who were initially free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Participants were followed for an average of 6.5 years. Adjustments were made for follow-up duration, dietary variables, and baseline anthropometric, demographic, and lifestyle factors.

Total fibre was inversely associated with weight and waist circumference change during the study period.  For a 10 gram/day higher total fibre intake, there was an estimated 39 g/year weight loss and waist circumference decreased by 0.08 cm/year. A 10 gram/day fibre intake from cereals results in 77 g/year weight reduction and 0.10 cm/year reduction in waist circumference. Fruit and vegetable fibre was not associated with weight change but had a similar effect on waist circumference as total and cereal fibre intake.

Over a period of 6.5 years, weight gain and increases in waist circumference would be expected in typical adults.  The findings of this research may support a beneficial role of higher intake of dietary fibre, especially cereal fibre, in prevention of weight and waist circumference gain.

Source :  Am J Clin Nutr Vol. 91, No. 2, 329-336, February 2010

You are invited to join us for a FUN and INSPIRATIONAL evening for women. Men can come too.

When: 21st June 2010

Where: Moda Events (formerly Gianni), Level 2, Portside Wharf, Remora Rd, Hamilton

Time: 6.00 PM Hospitality, start 7.00 PM ~ 9.30 PM

This 5-Star Gold Class event is on ‘Empowering Women’ in the workplace or in business.

We have secured Amanda Gore (USA /AUS) as the first speaker who will share the power of the mind, the proven brain and heart connection that makes a successful business and personal life for today’s woman.  She has Physiotherapy in her background and is now an International speaker who travels around the world empowering women in the business world.

The second speaker is Collette Larsen (USA) who has just completed a trip to climb Mount Everest.  She has a great story to tell and I am sure it will bring tears to many eyes. I heard her spoke a few years ago and she moved my heart. She had two terminally ill children, faced bankruptcy only to turn her life around and inspire audiences throughout the world.  Collette is a powerful, wealthy and inspiring woman who has a message from the heart about empowerment, self belief and business choice.

Hear from them how they mastered success. You’ll learn:

  • How to live on purpose, with balance, enthusiasm, focus and energy.
  • That success is about knowing what you want and where you’re going, and pursuing your goals with creativity, persistence and determination.
  • That success comes from purpose and passion, from being “driven” by a dream or “pulled” by a sense of mission.
  • That when we’re self-empowered we can empower others.
  • That we can be successful if we do what successful people have done – we will get the results that they have got.

In a nutshell, the message for the evening will be “The most successful, wealthy and recognised women today are the ones who’ve discovered their Heart, Body and Mind Connections”.

That success is no longer defined by age, colour, race, your job position, how many letters you have after your name, how many hours you put into your day or how much stress you live with. The truly healthy body, mind and attitude will determine the level of attraction of all great things into your life.

I’m excited about Amanda and Collette who are both international speakers, absolute Masters of heart, body and mind connection and are both earning more in one week than most of us dream of in a year. I’ve had the opportunity of spending personal time with these powerful community players and generous spirited women. They will share what they did and how they got there.

I am very happy to invite you to this event. It will be a really socially interactive, informative and educational night and you will have a lot of fun. We have over $5,000 worth of prizes to give away…but you have to be there to win.

It is FREE when you come as my guests and you are welcome to bring two or three girlfriends along with you.  I’m sure they will thank you for a great night.

On that evening, there will be a collection table if you like to make a donation to the HeartKids charity – helping children with heart disease.

I look forward to welcoming you personally on the night. Please RSVP to me by phone: 0413 342 967 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              0413 342 967      end_of_the_skype_highlighting or email: jackie@besttruehealth.com

More info on the link

http://www.besttruehealth.com/empowering-women.pdf

Warmly,

Jackie Khor

“Enabling people to achieve their Vision”

Brisbane, AUS

Mob: +61 413 342 967

P.S.  There will be similar events held in other cities with different speakers. If you like, you can invite your contacts to attend in the other cities. They can SMS or email me so that I can arrange for the organisers to personally welcome them.

AUCKLAND

Saturday, 19 June 3.00-5.30pm

The Langham Hotel

83 Symonds Street, Auckland

The Great Room

PERTH

Wednesday, 23 June 7.00-9.30pm

Rendezvous Observation City Hotel

The Esplanade, Scarborough

The Harbour Suite

MELBOURNE

Thursday, 24 June 7.00-9.30pm

Hilton on the Park

192 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne

Grand Ballroom

Melbourne Flyer: http://www.besttruehealth.com/women_melb.pdf

SYDNEY

Saturday, 26 June 3.00-5.30pm

Courtside Function & Event Centre

Tennis Centre

Rod Laver Drive, Sydney Olympic Park, Homebush Bay

Guests are FREE

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